Do the Five Combinations of Suicidal Ideation in the FDA 2012 Draft Guidance Document and the C–SSRS Adequately Cover All Suicidal Ideation Combinations in Practice? A Case Study

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Do the Five Combinations of Suicidal Ideation in the FDA 2012 Draft Guidance Document and the C–SSRS Adequately Cover All Suicidal Ideation Combinations in Practice? A Case Study

On February 14, 2018, Posted by , With Comments Off on Do the Five Combinations of Suicidal Ideation in the FDA 2012 Draft Guidance Document and the C–SSRS Adequately Cover All Suicidal Ideation Combinations in Practice? A Case Study

by Jennifer M. Giddens and David V. Sheehan, MD, MBA
J. Giddens is Co-founder of the Tampa Center for Research on Suicidality, Tampa, Florida; and Dr. Sheehan is Distinguished University Health Professor Emeritus, University of South Florida College of Medicine, Tampa, Florida.

 

Abstract

Objective: The United States Food and Drug Administration’s newest classification system for suicidality assessment anchors suicidal ideation to various combinations of passive suicidal ideation, active suicidal ideation, method, intent, and plan. This is based upon the suicidal ideation categories in the Columbia–Suicide Severity Rating Scale. Although there are 32 possible combinations of these suicidal ideation phenomena, the Food and Drug Administration’s 2012 system and the Columbia–Suicide Severity Rating Scale accommodate six combinations. We use a case study to explore the impact of possible type II errors on suicidality classification posed by not including remaining 26 possible categories.
Methods: A suicidal subject kept detailed daily records of her experience of suicidality over two separate intervals of eight-months’ and nine-months’ duration. These records permitted classification of individual events into each of the possible 32 suicidal ideation combinations.
Results: Although only a small percentage of all events of suicidality from either collection period fell outside of the Food and Drug Administration’s classification system and the Columbia –Suicide Severity Rating Scale categories, those that were not so categorized constituted a large percentage of the time this subject experienced suicidality.
When these two timeframes were aggregated, more than half of the subject’s time spent experiencing suicidality fell into the suicidal ideation combinations not captured by the Food and Drug Administration’s classification system
and the Columbia–Suicide Severity Rating Scale categories.
Conclusion: This case study suggests that type II errors in the Food and Drug Administration’s classification system and in the Columbia–Suicide Severity Rating Scale categories for suicidal ideation may represent important omissions.
Keywords: Suicide scale, suicide assessment, suicide risk, suicide attempt, suicide, suicidal ideation, suicidal behavior, suicidality, C–SSRS, FDA 2012 Draft Guidance Document

 

How to Cite this Article

Giddens, J. M., & Sheehan, D. V. (2014). Do the Five Combinations of Suicidal Ideation in the FDA 2012 Draft Guidance Document and the C–SSRS Adequately Cover All Suicidal Ideation Combinations in Practice? A Case Study. Innovations in Clinical Neuroscience, 11(9-10), 172.  PDF:  http://innovationscns.epubxp.com/i/425963/172

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