NSPC 2017

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HarmResearch gave the following presentations at the 2017 Nevada Suicide Prevention Conference (NSPC):

Thursday, October 12th, 2017, 8 am to Noon Workshop
Friday, October 13th, 2017, 9 am to 10 am Keynote


Thursday, October 12th, 2017 Workshop

 

Suicidality Assessment and Documentation for Healthcare Providers

 

David V Sheehan MD, MBA, DLFAPA 1, 2, 3

Jennifer M Giddens 2, 3, 4

1 University of South Florida College of Medicine, Tampa, FL, USA

2 Harm Research Institute, Tampa, FL, USA

3 Tampa Center for Research on Suicidality, Tampa, FL, USA

4 University of South Florida College of Arts and Sciences, Tampa, FL, USA

 

For more information about this workshop click here

 

Date:  Thursday, October 12th, 2017

Time:  8 am to Noon

Location:   Red Mountain Building, Room 256, Dandini Campus, Truckee Meadows Community College, Reno, NV

Abstract:

Suicide is the 15th leading cause of death worldwide and a leading cause of malpractice actions in psychiatry.  Clinicians become alarmed when patients discuss suicidality.

The product information on most psychiatric drugs advises clinicians to assess and monitor their patients for suicidality before starting and throughout the course of treatment.  The expectations on how to properly conduct and document suicidality assessments increased significantly following the inclusion of boxed warnings on suicidality for most psychiatric medications.  Healthcare providers need guidance on how to do this in a time efficient manner.  Skillful assessment protects their patients, and the documentation protects the healthcare provider.

This course operationalizes how to properly assess and document suicidality:

1.  Use a suicidality tracking scale to assess suicidality

2.  If needed, use a suicide plan tracking scale to document suicidal planning

3.  Use the structured diagnostic interview to classify patient’s suicidality symptoms into the 12 suicidality disorder phenotypes

4.  Decide a course of treatment based on suicidality disorder phenotype

5.  Document and summarize the findings from the above in the medical record for medico-legal protection

6.  Use the suicidality tracking scales to monitor response to treatment

The faculty will involve the audience interactively at frequent intervals throughout the course through liberal use of questions and answer discussions, small group discussions, and instructional simulation games.  The faculty will provide all course participants with templates and practical assessment tools that are useful in clinical practice settings.

Learning Objectives:

At the conclusion of this session the attendee will be able to:

1.  Conduct and properly document a thorough suicidality assessment.

2.  Identify the different suicidality disorder phenotypes and identify the treatment most likely to be helpful for each phenotype.

3.  Properly monitor suicidality during the course of pharmacological and other treatments for psychiatric disorders and understand the limitations of and problems associated with suicide prediction.

Literature References:

1.  Sheehan, DV and Giddens, JM. (2016). Suicidality Assessment and Documentation for Healthcare Providers: A brief, practical guide. (1st ed.). Tampa, FL: Harm Research Press. May 2016.

2.  Koslow, S. H., Ruiz, P., & Nemeroff, C. B. (Eds.). (2014). A Concise Guide to Understanding Suicide: Epidemiology, Pathophysiology and Prevention. Cambridge University Press.

3.  Shea, S. (1999). The practical art of suicide assessment.

4.  Sheehan, DV and Giddens, JM. Suicidality Disorders Criteria. In: Sheehan, DV and Giddens, JM. (2015). Suicidality: A Roadmap for Assessment and Treatment. (1st ed.). Tampa, FL: Harm Research Press. November 2015, p. 82-126.

How to Cite:

Sheehan DV, Giddens JM. Suicidality Assessment and Documentation for Healthcare Providers. Workshop. 2017 Suicide Prevention Conference, Nevada Coalition for Suicide Prevention (NCSP), Reno, NV, October, 12, 2017.


 

Friday, October 13th, 2017 Keynote

 

Assessment and Pharmacological Treatment of Suicidality

 

David V Sheehan MD, MBA, DLFAPA 1, 2, 3

Jennifer M Giddens 2, 3, 4

1 University of South Florida College of Medicine, Tampa, FL, USA

2 Harm Research Institute, Tampa, FL, USA

3 Tampa Center for Research on Suicidality, Tampa, FL, USA

4 University of South Florida College of Arts and Sciences, Tampa, FL, USA

 

Date:  Friday, October 13th, 2017

Time:  9 am to 10 am

Location:   Sierra Building, Room 108, Dandini Campus, Truckee Meadows Community College, Reno, NV

Abstract:

Long cherished views of suicide are undergoing revision. Once thought to be mainly a complication of depression, suicide rates are higher in a wide range of neuropsychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia, PTSD, panic disorder, social anxiety disorder, anorexia nervosa, substance dependence, and fibromyalgia. There is increasing evidence that suicidality may have a genetic component that may be transmitted independently of transmission of depression and other Axis I and Axis II psychiatric disorders. Inflammatory factors, autoimmune factors, and dietary intake of some substances, may also play a role in some cases.

Suicidality may not be linear as often assumed, but may follow non-linear dynamics as it changes over time. Suicidality may be a group of separate Axis I disorders, needing separate pharmacologic treatments. A classification of suicidality disorders will be presented. These revisions in our understanding of suicidality have led to calls for more sophisticated methods of assessment of suicide, the need for a phenotypic classification of suicide disorders, and improved and more targeted anti-suicidality medication treatments. It has resulted in the development of new assessment interviews and scales to capture these domains of suicidality with greater precision and reproducibility.

How to Cite:

Sheehan DV, Giddens JM. Assessment and Pharmacological Treatment of Suicidality. Keynote Presentation. 2017 Suicide Prevention Conference, Nevada Coalition for Suicide Prevention (NCSP), Reno, NV, October, 13, 2017.