ASCP 2017

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HarmResearch gave the following presentations at the 2017 Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Psychopharmacology (ASCP):

Wednesday, May 31st, 2017, 11:45 am to 1 pm Poster
Thursday, June 1st, 2017, 12:30 pm to 2 pm Poster


Wednesday, May 31st, 2017 Poster

 

Suicidality: A Linear or a Non-linear Progression Over Time?

David V Sheehan MD, MBA, DLFAPA 1, 2, 3

Jennifer M Giddens 2, 3, 4

1 University of South Florida College of Medicine, Tampa, FL, USA

2 Harm Research Institute, Tampa, FL, USA

3 Tampa Center for Research on Suicidality, Tampa, FL, USA

4 University of South Florida College of Arts and Sciences, Tampa, FL, USA

 

Click here to view or download a copy of this poster

 

Date:  Wednesday, May 31st, 2017

Time:  11:45 m to 1 pm

Location:  Salon 4, Loews Miami Beach Hotel, Miami Beach, FL

Poster Number: W48

Abstract:

Objective:  To investigate whether the progression of suicidality phenomena over time is linear or non-linear.  The model of progressive, linear suicidality is a long-standing assumption in suicidality research.  Understanding the progression of suicidality over time will help researchers build better predictive models of suicidality.

Design:  We adapted methods developed by Robert Stetson Shaw, a physicist at the University of California at Santa Cruz, to analyze the progression of suicidality phenomena in 2 continuous data sets from a single case over time. These methods are used in non-linear dynamics theory / non-linear systems theory / turbulence theory / deterministic chaos and permit data to be graphically displayed in 2- and 3-dimensional space over time.

Results:  The method permitted the mathematical graphic modeling of suicidality phenomena over 3 years in the form of 2D and 3D attractor plots.  The results showed a non-linear dynamic progression of suicidality phenomena over time. There was no linear progression in the rate of change in the relationship between suicidal ideation and behavior, over time.

Conclusions:  The trajectory of suicidal phenomena over time is non-linear and dynamic.  This data is displayed graphically as attractor plots that reflect the underlying structure of suicidality and its dynamic, turbulent change over time.  To improve predictive models of suicidality, progressive, linear models need to be abandoned in favor of non-linear, mathematical modeling of dynamic systems that more accurately reflect the turbulence, unpredictability, and dynamic nature of the complex systems of suicidality phenomena as they move through time.

Learning Objectives:

Following this presentation, participants will be:

1.  Understand that suicidality may not follow a linear progression, but follows a model of chaos dynamics.

2.  Appreciate the need to consider non-linear dynamic systems mathematical modeling when building predictive models of suicidality.

3.  Understand that most (if not all) research on risk and protective factors for suicidality are based on linear models and may not accurately model the true non-linear dynamic nature of suicidality.

Literature References:

1.  Robert Shaw, The Dripping Faucet As a Model Chaotic System, Science Frontier Express Series, Aerial Press, December 1984, ISBN 0-942344-05-7.

2. Giddens JM, Sheehan DV. Study of Magnesium in the Treatment of Impulse Attack Suicidality Disorder. In: Sheehan, DV and Giddens, JM. (2015). Suicidality: A Roadmap for Assessment and Treatment. (1st ed.). Tampa, FL: Harm Research Press. November 2015, p. 249-267.

3.  Sheehan DV, Giddens JM. (2016). Suicidality Assessment and Documentation for Healthcare Providers: A Brief, Practical Guide. (1st ed.). Tampa, FL: Harm Research Press. April 2016.  p. 93-99.

How to Cite:

Sheehan DV, Giddens JM. Suicidality: A Linear or a Non-linear Progression Over Time? Poster. Annual Meeting, American Society of Clinical Psychopharmacology (ASCP), Miami, FL, May, 31, 2017.


Thursday, June 1st, 2017 Poster

 

A Classification of Suicidality Disorders Phenotypes
(12 Phenotype Version)

 

David V Sheehan MD, MBA, DLFAPA 1, 2, 3

Jennifer M Giddens 2, 3, 4

1 University of South Florida College of Medicine, Tampa, FL, USA

2 Harm Research Institute, Tampa, FL, USA

3 Tampa Center for Research on Suicidality, Tampa, FL, USA

4 University of South Florida College of Arts and Sciences, Tampa, FL, USA

 

Click here to view or download a copy of this poster

 

Date:  Thursday, June 1st, 2017

Time:  12:30 pm to 2 pm

Location:  Salon 4, Loews Miami Beach Hotel, Miami Beach, FL

Poster Number:  T44

Abstract:

Objective: To provide a classification of suicidality disorder phenotypes.  The view that suicidality is trans-nosological and that all forms of suicide are the same, is not consistent with response to pharmacological treatment evidence.  For example, antidepressants make suicidality better in some patients, worse in others, and are no better than placebo for a third group.  This suggests that there may be more than one type of suicidality.

Design: We used a phenomenological1 approach by observing in detail and directly communicating with subjects over time about their suicidality.

Results: We developed diagnostic criteria and a related structured diagnostic interview for 12 distinct suicidality disorder phenotypes2. These include 1) Impulse Attack Suicidality Disorders, 2) Homicidal Suicidality Disorders, 3) Psychotic Suicidality Disorders, 4) Obsessive Compulsive Suicidality Disorders, 5) PTSD Suicidality Disorders, 6) Eating Disorder / Malabsorption Suicidality Disorders, 7) Substance Induced Suicidality Disorders, 8) Medical Illness / Neurological Condition Induced Suicidality Disorders, 9) Anxiety Disorder Induced Suicidality Disorders, 10) Mood Disorder Induced Suicidality Disorders, 11) Life Event Induced Suicidality Disorders, and 12) Suicidality Disorders, Not Elsewhere Classified.  Among these phenotypes the description of Impulse Attack Suicidality Disorder is new.  This disorder is associated with unexpected, unprovoked, unpredictable attacks of an urgent need to kill oneself.

Conclusion: We offer 12 suicidality disorder phenotypes.  Because these phenotypes may have a different response to treatment, each phenotype should be investigated separately when investigating anti-suicidality treatments and when investigating the relationship between genetic and other biomarkers in suicidality.

Learning Objectives:

Following this presentation, participants will be better able to:

1.  Identify the different phenotypes of suicidality disorders.

2.  Appreciate that not all clinical phenotypes of suicidality disorders have the same clinical features, natural history, response to life events, prognosis, or response to treatment.

Literature References:

1.  Spiegelberg, H. (2015, June 11). Phenomenology. Retrieved October 24, 2015, from http://www.britannica.com/topic/phenomenology

2.  Sheehan DV, Giddens JM. Suicidality Disorders Criteria. In: Sheehan, DV and Giddens, JM. (2015). Suicidality: A Roadmap for Assessment and Treatment. (1st ed.). Tampa, FL: Harm Research Press. November 2015, p. 82-126.

3.  Sheehan DV, Giddens JM. (2016). Suicidality Assessment and Documentation for Healthcare Providers: A Brief, Practical Guide. (1st ed.). Tampa, FL: Harm Research Press. April 2016.  p. 93-99.

How to Cite:

Giddens JM, Sheehan DV. A Classification of Suicidality Disorder Phenotypes (12 Phenotypes Version). Poster. Annual Meeting, American Society of Clinical Psychopharmacology (ASCP), Miami, FL, June, 1, 2017.